About your Search

20130211
20130219
STATION
CNBC 5
CSPAN 4
MSNBC 4
MSNBCW 4
SFGTV2 4
CNN 2
CNNW 2
KNTV (NBC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
WTTG 1
LANGUAGE
English 32
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
creates a welcoming environment for everybody. there is no cultural barrier to entry. >> the demographic of people who come will match the demographic of the reader. it is very simple. if we want more people of color, you book more people of color. you want more women, your book more women. kind of like that. it gets mixed up a little bit. in general, we kind of have a core group of people who come every month. their ages and very. we definitely have some folks who are straight. >> the loyal audience has allowed michelle to take more chances with the monthly lineup. established authors bring in an older audience. younker authors bring in their friends from the community who might be bringing in an older author. >> raider has provided a stage for more than 400 writers. it ranges from fiction to academics stories to academic stories this service the underground of queer fell, history, or culture. >> and there are so many different literary circles in san francisco. i have been programming this reading series for nine years. and i still have a huge list on my computer of people i need to ca
ago. -- 7th street about 10 years ago. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with artists, being in a culture where artists are driving, and where a huge amount of them is a healthy environment. >> you are making it safer. push, push. that is better. when i start thinking, i see it actually -- sometimes, i do not see it, but when i do, it is usually from the inside out. it is like watching something being spawned. you go in, and you begin to work, excavate, play with the dancers, and then things began to emerge. you may have a plan that this is what i want to create. here are the ideas i want to play with, but then, you go into the room, and there maybe some fertile ideas that are becoming manifest that are more interesting than the idea you had initially set out to plan. so there has to be this openness for spontaneity. also, a sense that regardless of the deadline, that you have tons of time so the you can keep your creativity alive and not cut it off and just go into old habits. it is a lot like listening. really listening to watch wha
in this constrained budget environment. we must help ensure dhs become a better stewart of tax dollars. recommendations by today's witnesses will help us better understand the issues that dhs faces and identify ways to help dhs improve. i look forward to their testimony. the chairman bomb that recognize the ranking member of the subcommittee, for any statement he may have. >> thank you mr. chairman. it is a pleasure to be here. i welcome witnesses and members of the subcommittee. i am looking for to working with the chairman and a bipartisan and productive manner as we conduct oversight in the department of homeland's security and other security functions. it is apparent, having met with the chairman at length, that we see eye to eye on many issues related to the efficiency and effectiveness of the department. i appreciate his collaboration as we move this important agenda for tweets this is our first subcommittee meeting at cannot think of a better issue to examine. the department of, security has one of the largest budget in the federal government. each year brings in $40 million in
this great nation. our soldiers today operate in a most uncertain and unpredictable environment. it is the most dynamic and unpredictable i have seen in my over 36 years of service. unlike post-conflict drawdowns, where we have a termination of conflict due to a police treaty or a political decline of a -- peavece trearty or a political decline of a superpower, instead today we have 81,000 soldiers deployed, including 50,000 fighting in afghanistan, and thousands of others in kuwait, in the horn of africa. over 91,000 soldiers are stationed in over 160 countries. we have been in a continuous state of war in the last 12 years, the longest in our history. but today, in my opinion, the greatest threat to our national security is the fiscal uncertainty resulting from a lack of predictability in the budget cycle, a series of continuing resolutions, a threat of sequestration hanging over our heads, our country's inability to put its fiscal house in order compromise is the full readiness of the joint force, army, and will impact our ability to provide our security to our nation. we hav
environment, like the shooting range like this one. but last saturday, when he brought former marine 25-year- old eddie ray roth to a shooting range, he turned his weapon kyle. >> three men arrived at the rough creek lodge around 3:15 p.m. on the day of the murder. around 5:00 p.m., hunting guide that works for rough creek came across the two men. they were unresponsive. apparent gunshot wounds. >> reporter: kyle moved back to texas to be with his family after leaving the navy seals in 2009. he became famous following his best-selling book, american sniper, where he describes his 150 confirmed kills, appearing on "the o'reilly factor." >> so you were committed to killing these people because you and your heart believed that they deserved to die. >> i wasn't so much committed to killing them as i was, i'm committed to making sure every service member that was over there, whether american or allied, came home. >> reporter: kyle paired with fitco cares foundation, a nonprofit providing life coaching to in-need veterans. his friend, chad littlefield, was also gunned down. the attorney claims his
what it is like to be a policy maker trying to do different things in a partisan environment that have come to make the case why the fiscal challenges are so pressing. it is still import we were to come with a comprehensive plan to address them. campaign to fix the debt has been around for not very long but has amassed a tremendous group of support. from citizens across the country where we have 350,000 citizens to have joined the campaign, a present in 50 states, active organizations in 23 states in growing, partnerships with 205,000 small businesses. , and organizations all coming together in a way the country has to to explain why making tough choices of putting in place the policies that were required to get a hold of our nation's fiscal challenges is so important. i am proud to be joined by this tremendous group of former members of congress. i am going to turn it over to one of our three cochairs. do you have senator judd gregg and a few other people representing this new council. thank you very much. >> it is a pleasure to be here was so many of my former colleagues to serve thi
of the city, which was fountain square and environs. >> infrastructure. >> we had an infrastructure strategy. develop the banks, which is the river front. and begin to redevelop -- >> not your banks. the banks of the river. >> i was on board. >> the banks of the river. not the other banks. to your point, at the local level, a group came together, it was clearly in all of the stakeholders -- >> and that's a lot better than going to the federal government begging for that money and then the rest of the 49 states pay for it. >> it's all about leadership. if somebody has the courage, you know, to make a declaration about what winning might be, i think you'd be surprised at the number of americans that would stand up and stand behind it. >> so, a year ago, we'll just, you know, you did run. &g, we'd be remiss. >> three years ago. >> right. but a year ago, i looked at your successor and he was, i mean, there were -- did you make barbarians at the gate? who did you say made that up? >> eddie -- >> but he did and you got in trouble for saying it. anyway, for whatever reasons, mcdonald's was under as
to grow up in an environment like this, in a tough neighborhood, in a tough city. and i think that that is exactly why he's not here right now. i think this conversation is going on longer than anticipated, and the white house really said this was his main focus while he was here at the school was to talk to these young men, martin. >> okay. thank you so much, john yang. let's go back to mark glaze. mark, i just want to make the point for our viewers that john yang was just making, and i want to mention a few reports of deaths attributable to gun violence in the last 24 hours. a man outside dallas was shot and killed early this morning. an arkansas woman was killed in her apartment hour later. and on valentine's day a teenager in north carolina was killed while playing around with a shotgun with her brother. it would be wrong of us just to look at today and think that chicago is unique in some way. this is a nationwide problem, isn't it? >> and the point that our mayors make all of the time is that the public pays a lot of attention when there's a mass shooting because it's so
's a lot of money. you have to put it somewhere. >> if you're going to wait for the political environment to get better, you're going to be an old man. >> you can't wait for washington. get on with running your business. it's filibustering over hagel adds more fuel to the fire. >> yeah. >> so you just have to get on running your business. we haven't seen any change in climate behavior. also there's a better mood, we have not seen that translate into significant change for climate behavior. we think 2013 will be similar to 2012 because we did have the olympics and the presidential election. which you remember. >> i remember. >> you remember the results closely. it will be similar to 2013. digital will be strong. data, technology will be strong. but same general tone. so we don't see the real world having changed at all, really. >> there's one other -- oh, okay, we're going to go to the weather. but berkshire in adm. >> berk share made some new moves. you have new people making investment decisions there, too, todd and ted. but as for berkshire hathaway, it did take a new state and aerch mi
be potentially serious problem. you have to realize this is a captive audience. this is a closed environment. and many things could potentially go wrong. in general, carnival and all the other cruise lines are very good about dealing with these situations. >> i know you're a doctor and not an attorney, but i'm wondering if the illnesses that came as a result are real enough to where any kind of lawsuits would have a standing chance in court? >> again, i'm definitely not an attorney, but in general, there's a possibility that they could prove a case. anyone that flies or drives or gets in a ship knows there are a risks to that. this is kind of an unusual situation, but i would say the litigation would be handled appropriately. >> doctor, while the passengers may have gotten off the ship, are there any sort of lingering concerns out there? could there be illnesses or injuries that develop after they've left the ship? >> that's a great question. potentially, i would be careful to look for bacterial infections, diarrhea. people could be very stressed about this afterwards. post-traumatic stress
well trying to push into the environment of much more thoughtful progressive policies about these issues the. >> they have lots of money, though. so those are very successful companies. and you could argue because your doing some of the things you're augusting. >> no question. >> take me to a company that's struggling been take me to a company that can't afford to give out free food throughout the day and free massages throughout the day. >> they're not going to let people sleep for two hours in a room somewhere, are they? >> no. but this is make missing the point. until you make this intellectual shift, more hours means more productivity. even one less hour of sleep gives us one more hour to be productive. that's nonsense. what it gives us is one more hour to by be partially productive because you're tired. >> do you think europe is productive? >> they rest a lot over there. >> you've got naps after lunch, you work a slightly longer day, but it's -- >> it's overdetermined. there are too many factors going on for me to answer that question and the german economy is very diff
learning environment every single day. you know? michelle and i remember how tough it can be to find good and how expensive it can be too. the size of your paycheck, though, shouldn't determine your child's future. so let's fix this. let's make sure none of our kids start out the race of life already a step behind. let's make it a national priority to give every child access to a high quality early education. let's give our kids that chance. now, i do have to warn the parents who are here that still have young kids, they grow up to be like 5'10" and even if they're still nice to you, they basically don't have a lot of time for you on the weekends. they have sleepovers and dates. so thaul early investment just leads them to go away. now, what i also said on tuesday night is that our commitment to our kids' education has to continue throughout their academic lives. from the time our kids start grade school, we need to equip them with the skills they need to compete in a high-tech economy. that's why we're working to recruit and train 100,000 new teachers in the fields of the future, in scie
. in this environment right now, how does this change? what should the president do? >> well, i think he's laid a proposal out there. i think it's a good proposal. i think in the end what'll probably happen is he'll get it through if he sticks to it and he'll negotiate. it might not be $9 an hour, but maybe it's 8.25ds an hour. look, if you're right there on the brink of making $7.25 an hour, a dollar an hour more might mean something to you. look, in new orlealouisiana, in where i live right now, they have a 9.5% sales tax. they're talking about raising it to 14% maybe. can you imagine what that does to a minimum wage worker down here? it just slaughters people. thank god we've got people that are willing to stand up and point out what's going on here, how you can help these people without having any effect on employment. i don't know why we haven't done this a long time ago to tell you the truth. >> let's talk about congress for a moment. today we saw officially just an unprecedented filibuster of defense secretary nominee chuck hagel. is this the worst you've ever seen in congress? >> well,
in an environment where i, hey, you're' going to college and you don't have a choice. >> growing up in the 40's and 50's, do you ever feel like the cards were stacked against you because of the color of your skin? >> no, my parents did a very good job. we never felt as if we were limited in any way whatsoever. >> but the classroom was anything, but natural or easy for guy in high school. an average student, he excelled in math and science, but plodded along in everything else. >> harris: you had a guidance counselor who had doubts how you could move on at the next level. what did she tell your mom? >> i was committed at that time i wanted to be an aerospace engineer and senior year you talk to the college counselor helping you with college education and all of that stuff unfortunately this lady sort of thought that i may not be strong enough to get to college and recommended that i do something else. i ignored her. i think my mother was more upset and didn't let it bother me. >> you had a plan and how you envisioned yourself as an engineer and knew what you loved. did that make a difference, ha
when you go into that environment where everyone else is not maybe lined up with the way you believe in and the way you think, after, you know, time you could -- the stress could probably wear on you. >> meanwhile, irvine police told the "orange county register" that dorner did research on a woman and her fiance prior to killing them. police tied dorner to the slayings after reading a manifesto he wrote in which he sought revenge against those he believe ended his law enforcement career. >>> a former california mayor admits she stole more than $2 million from charity but says she had a brain tumor at the time. maureen o'connor took the money from her husband's foundation. the one-time san diego mayor went on a decade-long gambling spree from 2000 to 2009 in which she wagered more than $1 billion and lost millions. in a plea deal o'connor pled not guilty to money laundering and her trial will be delayed for two years while she works to repay the money. >>> coming up a little bit of sports. the eyes of the world on bay area college hoops. we have th
madoff out there? they certainly have perspective on regulatory environment and improvements made or not made since then. >> how much cost? >> roughly $600 million, if you add administrative cost close to $700 million in fees. that's paid by wall street, by you and me if we invest. >> $700 million to reclaim $9 billion. >> which they say is a decent investment. >> thank you very much. >>> ahead on the program, intel and netflix both unveiling big plans to be front and center on your tv set. julia borsten at a media conference in laguna niguel, california. >> that's right, simon, digital and tech giants here and making big moves to own a piece of the future of television. i'll tell you about intel and netflix announcements coming up after the break. look, if you have copd like me, you know it can be hard to breathe, and how that feels. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. spiriva
the merits of the way he trains. ill he' say in the training environment, the reason it's not a public video when you're doing any kind of training it evokes a lot of emotions to people and in this case to diversity. at usda a big part of the work they're doing is working with migrant workers and populations in fact broadly minority and i think that that's important that exists. there's a reason by the way, fortune 500 companies invest in this training because it does impact the way a workplace environment works, there's data to support that. spending in in area is important giving the work they do. we can question his training style and what worked and didn't for you, but i think the value of it is inherent in the data that does exist out there. >> the business we should make them say-- referring it pilgrims as illegal aliens, illegal immigrants, get some pushback and people want them referred to as undocumented workers. it's interesting to see that federal taxpayers effectively taking a side by saying, you if you use the term illegal alien, it's racist, it's got, you know, it's completely
in an effective way, what's also in a hostile environment. >> george weigel. great to get your perspective. i am sure you'll be watching for the white smoke as the rest of us will in the coming weeks. thanks so. . we'll have much more on the pope's decision this morning. >> right now natalie joins us with today's headlines good morning. >> good morning. officials say at least three people were so the in the newcastle county court in wilmington delaware. the mayor said the suspected gunman was dead and the man's wife was killed in the incident. two others were wounded. >>> a trail of destruction in mississippi after a powerful tornado tore through three counties. the weather channel's reynolds wolf is with the latest. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. i want to show you something in hattiesburg. take a look at this church, mt. caramel baptist church which was full. of course the people left. the tornado struck in the afternoon. pan over here on this side. street and we'll show you all this damage we have right over here off main street. part of a gas station devastated. debris as far as yo
exceptionally clear, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call 1-800-414-5999 or visit trylyric.com for a risk-free 30 day trial offer and free dvd and brochure. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. >>> sounds strange, but the horse meat scandal continues to spread across europe. six major french retailers have pulled lasagna off their shelves, this one month after horse meat was found in burgers supposed to be made of above. cat, explain this to us. this is showing up in sweden, uk, france, wasn't supposed to be there. how did this happen. >> reporter: that's the problem. nobody knows. this points to a huge breakdown in the foot chain. horse meat is eating in a lot of countries, france, italy, kazakhstan, their horses are raised for food, the problem is a lot of these were not actually sanctioned for human consumption, and nobody knows how it slipped into the system. >> what does that mean for people who ate this mea
, that everybody has to be involved. but we also have to remember that the broader economic environment of communities is critical as well. for example, we need to make sure that folks who are working now, often in the hardest jobs, see their work rewarded with wages that allow them to raise a family without falling nool poverty. >> so president obama there in chicago using some very emotional and personal terms to make his pitch for new gun control measures. at one point saying too many of our children are being taken away from us. he repeated his call for a vote on gun control saying they deserve a vote. he used those words during the state of the union speech on tuesday and then talked about the importance of families and raising children in these neighborhoods that are prone to vie len. at one point he said, i wish i had a father who was around and involved. let's bring in our strategy session to talk about this. democratic strategist hilary rosen and ari fleischer and gloria borger. let me start with you, hilary, why do you suppose that the president was using those terms in chicag
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)